The power of repeating your idea (over and over again)

What I learned from the book “The Automatic Millionaire” by David Bach can actually be summarized in one sentence, and that is: “If you want to be rich, automate your savings”.But in this post, I want to talk about something else that I learned from this book.

The things that I learned are not something that is written in the book, but are things that I learned while reading the book. The book talks about how you can be rich (in the long run) if you just start putting away some money ($100) every month, and it suggests that you should make it automatic (so that you don’t feel the pain). In other words, your bank or financial institution will deduct the amount that you decided to save every month automatically from your salary or savings account. It will take it and save it for you in your retirement account. That way, once it’s set up, you won’t have to make an effort to save every month. It will be automatic. And in the long run, you will be a millionaire. And he talks about this for 240+ pages!

Repetition works

Do you wonder why those pages which sell various eBooks and affiliate programs are very long? You scroll and scroll and scroll… for me I have never bought anything from such pages, but the fact is those pages work.

“A lie told often enough becomes truth” Vladimir Lenin

Lenin was correct, when you keep repeating something over and over again, people actually start to believe in it, that, what you are telling is actually the truth. That’s why those ebook pages are so (extremely) long, giving you all kinds of screenshots and facts, that other people who have purchased them already became so successful. And that you should be the next one to purchase it. And that they are giving you 70% discount if you buy now. Continue reading

Common mistakes of a new blogger

Every blog goes through different stages. First, as a new blog (beginning stage), then a growing stage, then maturity stage (and hopefully no decline stage). It is in beginning stage that many of us make mistakes. In this post, I would like to discuss some of these mistakes that new bloggers make. I will start the list, and hopefully you will complete it by contributing in the comments section.

Display RSS counter too early

Displaying your RSS count too early can have a detrimental effect on your RSS readership growth. Usually people will not subscribe when a blog has 10+ RSS readers. People like to follow the majority, because common sense tells them that, if many people are reading something – it must be interesting! On the other hand, when nobody (or less people) is reading a particular blog, they see no reason to subscribe to its RSS, neither will they visit back in the future.

Therefore in the beginning it’s better not to display your RSS count, it’s better to concentrate on writing good articles instead. When you have at least several hundred RSS readers, then you may put it up.

Display too many ads

Most bloggers want to make money with their blogs, and new bloggers are no different. One of the mistakes that new bloggers make is, putting too many ads on their blog. They think the more ads they put on their blog, the more money they will make. (Wrong!) They might make more money during the first few days, but later their blog will be cannibalized by their ads, thus generating very low income or no income at all.

The blog that have too many ads on it, simply cries out to new readers saying “Go back, and never come back to this blog again!”. Continue reading

Blogs with vision finish rich

What do I blog for? This is the question every blogger ought to be asking himself or herself.

Is it for money? If your answer is yes, then there is nothing wrong with it. But it’s a very slippery rope you are holding on to. And it’s not a long term strategy either. Why?

Let’s imagine this situation: Let’s assume that one fine day you lost all your advertisers, and your blog suddenly stopped making money. One month passed, it brought zero income. Two months passed, still no sign of any advertisers. Three months passed, you are still sitting on zero profit.

If this is the situation you are in, do you think you will still be blogging? My guess is – you won’t! Rather, right after the first month, you will be putting your blog on auction at sitepoint or shutting it down indefinitely.

So, how not to fail and blog for long term?

The answer is, in the vision. If you don’t have a vision, it’s very likely that you will be closing your blog (or selling it off) at the first crisis that you encounter. That’s what happened to many blogs recently.

In contrast, if you do have a vision, you will most likely to succeed almost all the challenges you meet in your blogging career (see the illustration).

Let’s say, your vision is to help bloggers improve their writing skills. Now, when you have such a vision, do you think some PageRank decrease will make you close your blog? Or worse, sell it to someone else? Of course, not!

Because you are NOT blogging for PageRank, neither for money, nor for self-promotion. Rather, you are blogging to help other bloggers improve their writing skills. And as long as you can help others improve their writing skills, I am sure you will be blogging for many many years to come. Continue reading

A Plan For Bloggers Struggling to Find New Readers

This article was guest blogged by Skellie from SkellieWag.org. She is a regular contributor to some of the top blogs like ProBloger.net, CopyBlogger, and ZenHabits. In this post Skellie will talk about ways to acquire new readers to your blog.

photo by IonBuckThe early stages of your blog are always the hardest. As your audience grows, others will shoulder some of the burden: they’ll link to you, recommend you, and vote for you on social media. In the beginning, however, there are few people around to help.

The process of ‘finding new readers’ is something every blogger needs to do. The word ‘finding’ very accurately describes the process. You can’t wait for an audience to find you. You need to go out and find them. You need to work out who they are, and go where they go.

In this post, I want to provide a concrete plan of action for anyone struggling to pull their blog out of a rut and find new readers. I used these same strategies to grow my own blog from nothing to 1,050 subscribers in three months.

1. Define your target audience

You can’t source-out new readers if you don’t know who you’re looking for. You also need to make sure the content you provide suits the kinds of people you are drawing to your blog. For that reason, defining a target audience is the first step any blogger should undertake.

If you haven’t and you’ve already started blogging, don’t fret. You can work out a target audience at any stage in your blog’s growth.

Your target audience essentially refers to whoever you are targeting with your content. What kinds of people will benefit most from what you write? What are they interested in? What are they not interested in?

If you have some readers already, you can work out what types of people they are by the comments they leave and the questions they ask. Are they bloggers? Designers? Gamers? Wannabe martial artists? Lawyers? Literature lovers?

Once you work out who you’d like to write for, this makes finding new readers a lot easier. If you know who you’re looking for, it’s a lot easier to deduce where they’re likely to be hanging out!

TIP: once you’ve decided on your target audience, let them know that the blog is written for them. After all, if you knew a blog was written specifically for you, you’d feel confident that most of the posts would be of interest.

Mention your target audience on your about page, or your tag line, or even within your blog’s title (SEOmoz, for example, is written for people who practice SEO). Continue reading

Blog life cycle, and how success kills the content

Every blog (in the Make Money Online category) goes through a “blog life cycle”, some blogs go through all stages and others experience only some of them, i.e they do not reach the end. These stages of the “blog life cycle” (defined by me) are:

  1. State 1: blog creation – new blog gets created
  2. Stage 2: blog recognition – blog starts to get recognized in the blogosphere and often gets linked by other blogs, success is near
  3. Stage 3: blog authority – blog becomes authority in certain field, traffic soars and money pours in…
  4. Stage 4: after success – blog either turns into community based blog that is run by the original blogger, or is run by the same blogger but loses the usefulness that it once had

High traffic often leads to content-kill

When your blog starts to get high traffic and your readership expands, it often leads to positive changes for you (the blogger) and not so positive for the readers.

Because when your blog is getting hundreds of thousands of unique visitors a month, you will be approached by dozens of different types of advertisers. Most of them will be direct advertisers, and you will rely less on the traditional publisher programs that most of the blogs in the blogoshpere are using.

That means, if previously you were writing on various publisher programs and how they performed on your blog, after Stage-4 of the blog life cycle, you won’t be talking about them anymore. You won’t be citing different publisher programs and how much money each made for you. This types of posts are usually a good indicator to your readers about various publisher programs’ performances.

But when you are running direct advertisers, and no longer using normal publisher programs, you won’t be posting such posts anymore. And that, diminishes some degree of usefulness from your content. Continue reading

Why poll results on most blogs are skewed?

One of the mistakes new bloggers do is to end up talking exactly what other established bloggers are talking. Not only on topics that are “the current events” in the blogosphere, but even going as far as reporting their daily life posts. You need to take into account that people have already read those popular blogs, so they don’t want to read it on another blog from a secondary person.

Visitors want to read something original. And if you want to increase your readership you should give them original, new, and interesting posts. So how do you do that? Here is some of the suggestions to keep your posts original:

  1. Take notes, write draft posts, and record ideas when they strike you

Taking notes and writing draft posts is very important. It will help you to save time when you want to blog. Because when you sit to blog, there will be a draft post that you can continue right away. This way, you won’t have to think about what to blog.

I do have up to 10 draft posts at one time. If you are not using draft posts, then I strongly recommend you to use it.

Carry a pen and notepad when you are not near to your PC. This way, you can record the idea when it hits you. Most of the ideas will be forgotten if you do not record them. And it’s very difficult and time consuming to remember them back.

  1. Do read other popular blogs but do not be their carbon copy

It’s good to read other popular blogs and to keep yourself up to date with what’s happening in the blogosphere. But do not let these other blogs affect your own style of blogging. Do not be their carbon copy. Unless it’s necessary to blog about what other blog has posted, refrain from blogging about it (in a dedicated post). If you just want to repost what someone has posted then it’s better not to. Just remember people have already read about that! Continue reading

Entrepreneurial Death Traps

I was reading this article called “Entrepreneurial Death Traps – How to avoid the classic entrepreneurial mistakes”. If you are ever going to start your own business in the future then you should read this article and take into account the advices given. Because you don’t want to repeat those problems.

Friend as a Co-Founder

It discusses about the partnership issues that start with a simple trust between friends and turns into a major problem later on. For example: Two friends launching a start-up together with 50/50 share. After few years one works and another simply looses interest and doesn’t work. The one who does not work still gets paid every month, and owns 50% of the company. Without his consent no major decision cannot be taken, and that includes firing him. So they are trapped.

Second example:

What about the three (or four) (or five) musketeer’s death trap. Although in one sense it’s a corollary of the 50-50 partnership deathtrap, in some ways it’s even more insidious. You know the story. Three friends decide to start a company. They split the ownership absolutely equally, they draw identical salaries, they’re going to make decisions “by consensus.” It’s the logical, “fair” thing to do. One of them (perhaps the oldest or the one whose idea it was originally) reluctantly assumes the presidency because state law requires there to be one.

What a recipe for failure! There are three primary problems with this set-up. First, this company has no leader, no one ultimately responsible for its success or failure. Second, sooner or later a major, honest difference of opinions will arise. What do they do then? Third, the reluctant president will almost inevitably come to see himself as “a little more than equal.” If they have any success, for example, and get written up in the local or trade press, guess whose picture the reporter will want? Guess whose quotes will be plastered all through the story? Guess which other two people are going to hang the article on their family room dart board?

The solution? Pick a CEO and treat him like one. Give him the largest equity position and salary, even if they are only symbolically larger. Somebody has to sit where the buck stops.

There are many more advices and examples, read the full article at http://www.vcinstitute.org/bookstore/deathtraps.html

I think it’s really important to make everything clear before you set out for a business with your friends. Discussing all the financial things might sound a bit money minded first, but that can actually save your friendship later on. What do you think?